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Conn. Education Spending Among Highest in U.S.

In Connecticut, the school districts that spend the most per pupil probably aren't the ones you're thinking of.

 

With the school year and the campaign season coinciding in September, the issue of school spending is often at the forefront. Politicians often advocate for more investment in education — or at least getting rid of potentially wasteful spending that could bog down services.

Regardless of personal views on funding public education, the fact is that Connecticut spends among the highest per pupil in the United States. A report from the U.S. Census Bureau released in June shows Connecticut ranks seventh in the nation with Washington D.C. included. Connecticut’s $14,906 spent per student in 2009-10 is the second highest in New England behind Vermont.

More recent numbers are available for the spending of all the school districts in Connecticut. In 2010-11, Bethany spent $13,510 per student, Woodbridge spent $14,912 and the shared district of Region No. 5 spent $13,924.

Full numbers for every district are attached to this article in a PDF, and the below charts reveal the biggest spenders in the state and country.

Biggest Spenders Per Pupil by State

State Spending Per Pupil (2009-10) Washington D.C. $18,667 New York $18,618 New Jersey $16,841 Alaska $15,783 Vermont $15,274

Wyoming 

$15,169

Connecticut

$14,906

Massachusetts

$14,350

Maryland 

$13,738

Rhode Island

$13,699


Biggest Spenders Per Pupil in Connecticut

School District Spending Per Pupil (2011) Total Budget (2011) Canaan $22,105.83 $3,094,595 Cornwall $22,051.40  $3,735,508

Sharon

$21,928.31 $6,283,556

Region No. 1 (Canaan, Cornwall and nearby towns)

$20,734.70  $10,429,556

Region No. 12 (Bridgewater, Roxbury, Washington)

$20,468.56 $19,115,792

Biggest Budgets By District ($100 Million-Plus)

School District Total Budget (2011) Spending Per Pupil (2011) Hartford $379,784,614  $18,100.25 New Haven $326,302,162  $18,500.16 Bridgeport $281,947,431 $13,458.71 Waterbury $256,520,588 $14,579.56 Stamford $246,545,506 $16,302.39 Norwalk $173,065,848 $15,509.44 Greenwich $161,471,040 $18,516.30 Fairfield $146,844,750 $14,379.95 New Britain

$137,063,891

$12,626.37 West Hartford

$133,734,360

$12,800.66 Danbury

$124,425,721

$11,866.41 Meriden

$114,391,035

$12,429.38 Milford

$104,002,503

$14,806.12 Manchester

$102,489,391

$13,658.20 Westport

$100,058,692

$17,435.14
jaimemorrissey July 27, 2012 at 11:08 AM
I have been a student at one of the High Speed Universities online since August 2009 and it has been an answer to my prayers. Their assessments and papers are NO easy task, so for those who say online schools are ""dummed down"" are highly mistaken.
Diane Kuczo July 27, 2012 at 12:37 PM
What is wiltons per student spending vs. Total budget? Would love to see a % comparison by district of student spending and admin spending.
Lorna July 27, 2012 at 03:07 PM
Good call. I think the salaries for the top administrators are grossly bloated.
Eustace Tilley July 27, 2012 at 06:57 PM
Salaries are 59.7% of the total budget. there are 3 categories: Traditional classroom teachers are 52.7% of the total salary budget Other 'Certified" salaries are 26.6% of the salary budget (which includesAdministrators, Spec Ed, Program support, Guidance, speech, reading, psychologists, library,coaches,social workers, clubs,ELL teacher) Other "classified" salaries are 20.7% of the salary budget (which includes paraprofessionals,custodial,clerical,tech support,supervisory)
Franklin Wong July 27, 2012 at 09:54 PM
Just lookied at some data that suggests that the higher percentage that education represents of a town budget will correlate with student achievement more than per student spending.

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