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Know Your Chiles

To keep your Mexican dishes authentically delicious, here are some pointers about chiles.

Know Your Chiles

To keep your Mexican dishes authentically delicious, here are some pointers about chiles.  If you were asked to identify one characteristic that would singularly describe Mexican dishes, the “chile” would be the answer, namely chile peppers.  Whether ground, whole, sliced, diced, pickled, fresh, canned or dried, chile peppers are an inherent part of Mexican dishes. 

There are many varieties of chiles, ranging from mild to very hot!  Chefs use whatever chiles are available to them.  Some varieties are available canned when they aren’t available fresh.  Here is a list of some common peppers. 

Green Peppers:  Also called bell peppers.  They are very mild peppers and are used in salads as a garnish and they are used to flavor & color dishes.

Anaheim:  Also called California peppers.  They are mild, long green chiles.  They can be eaten raw and are used in salads. 

Jalapenos: They are smaller sized and dark green chiles.  They are typically very hot. 

Serranos:  They are smaller and slimmer than jalapenos, but be warned they are hotter too!

Ancho:  These chiles are plump and dark green chiles that range from mild to medium.  Ancho means “wide,” that’s why these are usually the best choice for chile rellanos. 

Yellow Hots:  They are longer than jalapenos and moderately hot.  These chiles are used in hot mixes, along with other chiles and are used in salsas.  They are also used as a garnish to color dishes. 

Wax Chiles:  These chiles are small, slender, yellow chiles and are used in pickled mixes, in salsas and as a garnish. 

Chilitepins:  These chiles are tiny and seedy red peppers.  They are used for seasoning in salsas in combination with other chiles.  They are also used in pickling.  Warning…they are VERY hot!

You can roast chiles over the top burner of your stove.  Make sure to turn frequently to keep the chiles from burning.  You can cook three to four chiles at a time.  When the skins turn dark brown and look blistered then remove them from the heat.  Wrap the chiles in a damp kitchen towel or paper towel to make the skins easier to remove. 

Chiles can be roasted in an oven as well.  Place the chiles onto a parchment paper lined baking sheet.  Bake at 350º F.  until the skins are brown and blistered.  After roasting, wrap the chiles in a damp kitchen towel for a few minutes.  Then remove the skins. 

You can also dry chiles.  To dry chiles, make a chile “garland.”  Sting chiles up by their stems to make a cluster.  Let them hang to dry by placing them in a very dry place until they become dry.  Fresh green chiles turn from green to red when left to dry out.  Dried chiles are ready to use when they are crackly-dry. 

Chile garlands can also be used for decorations in your kitchen, living room or patio.  These sartas or ristras are a characteristic sight in the Southwest. 

To use dried chiles, just soak them in a hot water bath until they are softened.  Open the chiles up and remove the stem and seeds.  Puree them in a food processor or blender.  Add small amounts of water to process.  If the chiles are hot then add a water and vinegar mixture to help tame the chiles.  When a chili paste is made then make sure to pass through a sieve to make a smooth paste.  Season the paste as you desire to make salsas or for cooking. 

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

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